Relations pt. 2

Continuing from the last post on relations, other elements that fit into this category include coordination, distance, parallel, angle, negative/positive, transparent/opaque, tangent, overlapping, compound, subtraction, coincidence, penetration, extrusion, influence, modification, and variation.

Coordination occurs when objects appear to be on the same line of perspective. Distance is relative to the viewer’s perspective. Whether an object is close or far is similar to if it is big or small, it all just depends on the viewer.

Parallel is when two objects are equal distance apart and can never intersect. The angle of two lines has to do with the amount of space between the two.

Negative and positive space refers to the light vs. dark on a composition.

This logo incorporates clever usage of positive and negative space. While the eye might first be drawn to the positive space (white) and see the plugs and name of the company, if you then look at the negative space it is clear that the space between the plugs is making the letter E. (Designspiration)

This logo incorporates clever usage of positive and negative space. While the eye might first be drawn to the positive space (white) and see the plugs and name of the company, if you then look at the negative space it is clear that the space between the plugs is making the letter E.
(Designspiration)

Similarly, a transparent object is clear and the objects behind it will show through. Opaque is the opposite of transparent and is more solid. For example, clean water is a transparent liquid, while milk is considered opaque.

This photograph is an example of extremely transparent water. You can see even the bottom floor of this lake with great detail. The only thing that seems to give the viewer any sense of depth is perhaps the shadow beneath the girl floating. (flickr)

This photograph is an example of extremely transparent water. You can see even the bottom floor of this lake with great detail. The only thing that seems to give the viewer any sense of depth is perhaps the shadow beneath the girl floating. (Flickr)

Overlapping is when two objects are placed on top of each other. Compound is similar to overlapping and is when those two objects appear to create one object.

Here is an example of overlapping, but it also nicely demonstrates transparency/opacity. Notice that there are many semi-transparent squares, and where they overlap becomes much more opaque. (Designspiration)

Here is an example of overlapping, but it also nicely demonstrates transparency/opacity. Notice that there are many semi-transparent squares, and where they overlap becomes much more opaque. (Designspiration)

Variation is created when many repeated forms appear to have minor modifications. There are many ways to create variation such as variation of width, height, and displacement,.

This design incorporates repetition. Although color and direction differ, the objects have a repeating form within them. (Designspiration)

I have previously used this same image to demonstrate repetition but it is also an example of variety. There is a variation of color and also of orientation in the objects. (Designspiration)

After finishing this chapter in Christian Leborg’s Visual Grammar on relations, I decided to focus on one element that I found particularly interesting. I wanted to find something to supplement the idea of incorporating both negative and positive space in design. One website I found, Art Inspired, had a post that highlighted the importance of looking at both the object, and the area surrounding the object when creating a composition. While we usually just focus on the subject, which is usually the positive space, it is important to keep in mind that really powerful creative images can come out of negative space.

It also brought attention to the visual tricks that you can create using positive and negative space. A really well known example of this is the picture of two symmetrical side profiles staring back at each other. But is it really two faces, or can you see the goblet like shape the space between them creates?

Here is the famous example of how you can use positive and negative space to create an illusion. The eye might focus on one image first and then find the second read. (Art Inspired)

Here is the famous example of how you can use positive and negative space to create an illusion. The eye might focus on one image first and then find the second read. (Art Inspired)

 

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